CSCMP Supply Chain Management

The supply chain management (SCM) profession has continued to change and evolve to fit the needs of the growing global supply chain.  With the supply chain covering a broad range of disciplines, the definition of what is a supply chain can be unclear. Often times SCM can be confused with the term logistics management. CSCMP and the board of directors, comprised of industry experts, created official definitions for the following terms.

CSCMP’s Definition of Supply Chain Management
Supply chain management encompasses the planning and management of all activities involved in sourcing and procurement, conversion, and all logistics management activities. Importantly, it also includes coordination and collaboration with channel partners, which can be suppliers, intermediaries, third party service providers, and customers. In essence, supply chain management integrates supply and demand management within and across companies.

Supply Chain Management – Boundaries and Relationships
Supply chain management is an integrating function with primary responsibility for linking major business functions and business processes within and across companies into a cohesive and high-performing business model. It includes all of the logistics management activities noted above, as well as manufacturing operations, and it drives coordination of processes and activities with and across marketing, sales, product design, finance, and information technology.

CSCMP’s Definition of Logistics Management
Logistics management is that part of supply chain management that plans, implements, and controls the efficient, effective forward and reverses flow and storage of goods, services and related information between the point of origin and the point of consumption in order to meet customers' requirements.

Logistics Management – Boundaries and Relationships
Logistics management activities typically include inbound and outbound transportation management, fleet management, warehousing, materials handling, order fulfillment, logistics network design, inventory management, supply/demand planning, and management of third party logistics services providers. To varying degrees, the logistics function also includes sourcing and procurement, production planning and scheduling, packaging and assembly, and customer service. It is involved in all levels of planning and execution--strategic, operational and tactical. Logistics management is an integrating function, which coordinates and optimizes all logistics activities, as well as integrates logistics activities with other functions including marketing, sales manufacturing, finance, and information technology.

CSCMP

Founded in 1963, providing educational, career development, and networking opportunities to members and to the entire Supply Chain Management profession.